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Advanced Diploma of Hospitality Management

SIT60316 Advanced Diploma of Hospitality Management

This qualification reflects the role of highly skilled senior managers who use a broad range of hospitality skills combined with specialized managerial skills and substantial knowledge of the industry to coordinate hospitality operations. They operate with significant autonomy and are responsible for making strategic business management decisions.

CRICOS Course Code: 104557J

ABOUT COURSE

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Ashton College | Hospitality Management Course

“Learn exceptional and specialized knowledge and skills dedicated to a bright career and work in high-level management roles in the hospitality industry.”

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This qualification provides a pathway to work in any hospitality industry sector and for a diversity of employers including restaurants, hotels, motels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, cafés, and coffee shops. This qualification allows for multi-skilling and for specialization in accommodation services, cookery, food and beverage, and gaming.

The target market for this course is international students who hold an appropriate visa and wish to undertake this course to access employment as an:

  • area manager or operations manager
  • café owner or manager
  • club secretary or manager
  • executive chef
  • executive housekeeper
  • executive sous chef
  • food and beverage manager
  • head chef
  • motel owner or manager
  • rooms division manager.

in organisations such as restaurants, hotels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, and/or cafes.
Students may also wish to undertake the course to access further study opportunities.

Entry requirements

Students must be over 18 years of age at the time of course commencement.
Students must secure an appropriate visa that allows them to study in an Australian Registered Training Organisation prior to course commencement.

Academic entry requirements

To gain admission into this course, students must have successfully completed year 11 or secondary studies in their home country equivalent to Australian Year 11*. 

(*Subject to the assessment level of that country and the course undertaken there. For more information please visit Ashton College’s website.)

Students are encouraged to have completed both Diploma of Hospitality Management in order to enrol in this course. 

English Language Entry Requirements

International Students applying for this qualification must have a minimum English language proficiency of IELTS 5.5 (overall band) or an equivalent exam result recognised by the Department of Home Affairs.

Other equivalent English language proficiency level is deemed one of the following:

English language test providers Minimum score Minimum score and at least 10 weeks English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) Minimum score and at least 20 weeks ELICOS
International English Language Testing System (IELTS) 5.5 5 4.5
TOEFL internet-based test 46 35 32
Cambridge English: Advanced (Certificate in Advanced English) 162 154 147
Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic) 42 36 30
Occupational English Test B for each test component N/A N/A

Alternatively, students may satisfy the English Language Entry Requirements by fulfilling any of one of the following:

  • In the 2 years before applying for the student visa, the student has completed, in Australia and in the English language, either the Senior Secondary Certificate of Education or a substantial component of a course leading to a qualification from the Australian Qualifications Framework at the Certificate IV or higher level, while you held a student visa;
  • The student has completed at least 5 years study in English in one or more of the following countries: Australia, UK, USA, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, or the Republic of Ireland;
  • You are enrolled in a principal course of study that is a registered school course, a standalone English Language Intensive Course for Overseas Students (ELICOS), or a registered post-graduate research course;
  • You are an applicant who is a Foreign Affairs or, Defence sponsored student or a Secondary Exchange student (AASES);
  • You are a citizen and hold a passport from UK, USA, Canada, NZ or Republic of Ireland.

Training Pathway

Students who successfully complete this qualification may progress into Bachelor of Hospitality Management or higher education qualifications in management.

Employment Pathway

This qualification provides a pathway to work in any hospitality industry sector and for a diversity of employers including restaurants, hotels, motels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, cafés, and coffee shops. This qualification allows for multi-skilling and for specialization in accommodation services, cookery, food and beverage, and gaming.

Possible job titles include:

  • banquet or function manager
  • bar manager
  • café manager
  • chef de cuisine
  • chef patisserie
  • club manager
  • executive housekeeper
  • front office manager
  • gaming manager
  • kitchen manager
  • motel manager
  • restaurant manager
  • sous chef
  • unit manager catering operations.

All students are provided with the opportunity to have their prior learning and experience assessed and gain recognition for this.  (Recognition of Prior Learning – RPL).  

Students who have successfully completed whole units of competency included in this course with another RTO can apply for Credit Transfer/s(CT).

Learner needs are assessed at enrolment in accordance with the Enrolment Policy and Procedure.  Applicants complete the Enrolment and Pre-Training Review and submit supporting documentation to enable Ashton College to assess whether the course is appropriate for addressing their individual learner needs.

Once applications are received, they are assessed to ascertain whether the course addresses individual learner needs. The College will review the applicant’s prior experience, knowledge and skills in coming to this decision.

Decisions on whether the course is appropriate for addressing the applicant’s learning needs and whether the applicant can address the entry requirements are made.  Students with learning needs that require support are identified during the enrolment processes.

Support is provided for clients with identified needs in accordance with the Client Support Policy and Procedure.

Ashton College takes all feasible and reasonable steps to assist students during the course so they can successfully complete the course within the course schedule and achieve certification.

Reasonable adjustments will be made to ensure that the student is not presented with artificial barriers to demonstrating competency in the program of study. Reasonable adjustments may include the use of adaptive technology, educational support, and alternative methods of assessment such as oral assessment. Any adjustments made will be recorded in the student’s file.

The learning need that forms the basis of any adjustment to the training program will be identified and appropriate strategies will be agreed with the student. Any adjustments will be recorded in the student file.

Pre enrolment information

Ashton College provides information to students’ pre-enrolment on course demands and expectations via the Client Information Handbook and course information available on the Ashton College website. This information also identifies the process for assessing the learner needs during enrolment, the outcomes of assessment and details on how Ashton College supports individual learner needs post enrolment.

Orientation

Ashton College delivers an orientation to students outlining course requirements, processes, demands, support services and general information prior to course commencement.

Monitoring student performance in class

During scheduled classes and supervised study sessions trainers monitor student performance when completing tasks, participation in learning activities, completing homework and through responses to questions and questions asked. Formative assessment is also routinely undertaken. Trainers identify student abilities/ progress, learning needs/ issues from undertaking the above activities.

Trainers provide support to students in each class depending on individual learning and support needs e.g. explain concepts again, providing more one to one support, putting them in groups where they can learn of other students during group work tasks, providing extra time to complete tasks or referring them to learning materials to develop their knowledge and understanding. Students can also approach trainers or the Student support officer at any time to access learning support services.

Learning methodologies are planned and implemented by trainers as they progress through each unit. Trainers structure classes depending on the topic and individual learning needs of each student cohort. Learning activities for one group may have more of an emphasis on developing knowledge for one unit and on developing foundation skills for another. The individual needs of the cohort are considered, and activities planned accordingly.

Students with English language learning issues may be allocated more groupwork to develop knowledge and soft skills at the same time as their English language ability. The English-speaking abilities of students from some countries is often stronger than their English writing ability i.e. Indian students. This may be the opposite for Chinese students who sometimes struggle more with speaking in English.

The issues arising from the education system students have been exposed to in some countries also influences the learning activities to develop knowledge and skills. Some countries have more of an emphasis on theoretical knowledge and subsequently students struggle when it comes to developing skills to apply knowledge in given contexts. Again, the learning activities chosen will reflect these individual learning needs.

Monitoring course progress

Ashton College monitors students course progress in accordance with the Client Support Policy and Procedure and the National Code 2018 Standard 8 requirements.

Student course progress is monitored and students at risk of failing to achieve satisfactory course progress are identified. Trainers monitor performance and progress in class and can initiate intervention support for students by completing documentation and forwarding this to the Course Coordinator. Student results on the SMS are also monitored every fortnight. Students identified at risk of not achieving satisfactory course progress are identified, counselled and where relevant have intervention strategies initiated.

The college provides assistance if the student is experiencing difficulties and not progressing through their course as per the course schedule.

Ashton College employs a range of support services where appropriate and feasible to support students learning needs during course delivery.

Access to appropriate support services is provided to assist students to successfully complete their course within the scheduled duration.  Ashton College may refer students to external sources if they are unable to sufficiently provide support for students learning needs.

Refer to the Client Support and Completion Within Expected Duration policies and procedures for further details on how Ashton College monitors course progress and supports students to help ensure completion within the expected duration.

Students at Risk

Ashton College has intervention strategies, including student support services available to enable students to complete the qualification within the scheduled duration.

Students at risk of not completing their course within the scheduled duration are identified as early as possible.

Ashton College meets with all students who are not making satisfactory progress and with their agreement puts in place Intervention strategies to assist in their successful completion of the course.

Ashton College has defined “satisfactory progress” as successfully completing more than 50% of units undertaken in a study period.

Students who do not make satisfactory progress over two consecutive study periods will be reported in accordance with the requirements of the ‘The National Code 2018’.

This process is governed by Ashton College Client Support and Completion within Expected Duration Policy and Procedures.

Academic Support

Students who are experiencing difficulties with any aspect of their course are encouraged to contact their trainer or other relevant staff.  Our trainers are able to provide academic support to facilitate the successful completion of your course.

LLN Support

Students who are experiencing language, literacy and numeracy difficulties during the course can access support from our trainers.

If the level of support required is outside of what the trainer can provide then Ashton College will arrange a referral to internal LLN support services within the Academic Department.

Welfare Support

We understand that our students sometimes require extra support to help them cope with their training course. Sometimes there can be personal issues that impact their successful course completion.  We can assist students in accessing professional welfare services.  Students who are experiencing personal/ welfare issues that are impacting their studies are encouraged to contact their trainer or other relevant support staff. Please refer to Client Information Handbook for contact details of support staff members.

Students must successfully complete a total of 33 units of competency to achieve the SIT60316 Advanced Diploma of Hospitality Management. This comprises 16 core units and 17 elective units. The course units are indicated in the table below. 

Unit code Unit title Core/ Elective
BSBDIV501 Manage diversity in the workplace Core
BSBFIM601 Manage finances Core
BSBMGT517 Manage operational plan Core
BSBMGT617 Develop and implement a business plan Core
SITXCCS008 Develop and manage quality customer service practices Core
SITXFIN003 Manage finances within a budget Core
SITXFIN004 Prepare and monitor budgets Core
SITXFIN005 Manage physical assets Core
SITXGLC001  Research and comply with regulatory requirements Core
SITXHRM003 Lead and manage people Core
SITXHRM004 Recruit, select and induct staff Core
SITXHRM006 Monitor staff performance Core
SITXMGT001 Monitor work operations Core
SITXMGT002 Establish and conduct business relationships Core
SITXMPR007 Develop and implement marketing strategies Core
SITXWHS004 Establish and maintain a work health and safety system Core
SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety** Elective
SITHCCC020 Work effectively as a cook^ Elective
SITHCCC001 Use food preparation equipment* Elective
SITHCCC005 Prepare dishes using basic methods of cookery * Elective
SITHCCC018 Prepare food to meet special dietary requirements* Elective
SITHCCC006 Prepare appetisers and salads* Elective
SITHCCC008 Prepare vegetable, fruit, egg and farinaceous dishes* Elective
SITHIND002 Source and use information on the hospitality industry Elective
SITHCCC007 Prepare stocks, sauces and soups* Elective
SITHCCC012 Prepare poultry dishes* Elective
SITHCCC013 Prepare seafood dishes* Elective
SITHCCC014 Prepare meat dishes* Elective
SITHCCC019 Produce cakes, pastries and breads* Elective
SITHPAT006 Produce desserts* Elective
SITXHRM002 Roster Staff Elective
BSBADM502 Manage Meetings Elective
BSBMGT502 Manage People Performance  Elective

Units with * require prior completion of the prerequisite unit

Units with ** is a prerequisite unit

Units with ^ involve 192 hours of mandatory work placement 

The course is delivered over 122 weeks consisting of 100 weeks of tuition and 22 weeks of holidays. This includes ten 10 week terms with nine two week term breaks and two 2 week Christmas breaks.  

Classes are scheduled for 20 hours of face to face delivery per week consisting of 8 hours per day for 2 days and one day for 4 hours per week. In addition, students are expected to undertake 4 hours of unsupervised independent study and assessment outside of scheduled class time per week. Students undertake 192 hours of work placement activities over the course. Students also have the option to attend supervised study sessions for 4 hours per week during term time.  Please refer to the course delivery schedule for further details.

The scheduled delivery hours for this course are as follows:

  • Face to face classes – 100 weeks x 20 hours per week = 2,000 hrs
  • Independent study and assessment outside of class time – 100 weeks x 4 hours per week = 400 hrs
  • Supervised study sessions – 100 weeks x 4 hours per week. = 400 hours. ** optional attendance. 
  • Work placement = 192 hrs
  • Total course hours: 2,000 + 400 + 192 = 2,992 hours

The course duration and volume of learning is in accordance with recommendations for Advanced Diploma level courses in the Australian Qualification Framework guidance.

The course duration is appropriate for addressing learner needs as it allows an appropriate amount of time for students to learn concepts, develop knowledge, and understanding. The course allows students to reflect on learning and apply skills and knowledge in situations outside of the classroom and opportunities for formative assessment and study, prior to undertaking the summative assessment.  

The amount of time dedicated to the delivery and formative assessment activities prior to students undertaking summative assessment can be amended to cater to individual learning needs. 

Learner cohort characteristics/needs, the Australian Qualifications Framework, Training package, industry feedback, and guidance on ‘Meeting the Volume of Learning Requirements’ in the User’s Guide to the Standards for RTO’s 2015’ which have been considered when formulating this Training and Assessment Strategy.

A blended delivery mode is implemented including face to face training, independent study and assessment outside of face to face classes, work placement, and optional supervised study sessions.  Classes will consist of groups of 18 students.

Face to face classes – 20 hours per week

All face to face delivery takes place in Ashton College’s training facilities at:

  1. Ashton College head campus: 213 Nicholson Street, Footscray Melbourne Victoria 3011 
  2. Ashton College Training Kitchen: Ashton Hotel School, Shop 16-18, Metro West Plaza, Footscray Victoria 3011. 
  3. Students work placement organisation 

Students will be timetabled to attend classes at both the above campus locations. Students will also be supported outside of face to face class time through e-mail and/or telephone.  

Some units are delivered stand-alone, and some are clustered together for delivery. Refer to the course delivery schedule for details on clusters. An understanding of the relationships between unit subjects is developed throughout the course. 

A timetable is given to each student pre-course commencement (at orientation).  Students are provided with an induction to the course to outline the learning and assessment processes, support services, and other relevant information during orientation.   

Textbooks for the course are provided to students. Students read relevant sections of the textbooks in preparation for the face to face classes.  Students attend a face to face classes for each unit at agreed stages throughout the course.  Students may contact their trainer for support/ assistance outside of scheduled face to face contact times.  

The following techniques are employed during face to face delivery depending on the subject matter:  trainer presentations and demonstrations, individual tasks, case studies, research, role plays, practical demonstrations, and group work.  The context of the simulated workplace environment will be incorporated into the delivery methodologies and students complete tasks to appropriate workplace standards.

By employing this approach knowledge is developed and implemented during learning activities where Students practice applying the knowledge in the classroom, simulated workplace environment, and during work placement. This approach also helps develop skills, confidence, and motivation and facilitates learning and development. 

The topics in each unit of competency are presented in a logical flow and related to previous topics addressed. Connections and relationships are outlined. The complexity of content and concepts is also developed – simple to complex. 

Practical learning and development activities are built in to facilitate incremental learning, development, and motivation for future learning. Feedback, encouragement, and formative assessment are integrated. Trainers build mentoring relationships with students over time to facilitate development.

Methods to promote participation in class include practice, re-enforcement, providing encouragement, recognition of achievement or attempts, providing feedback, and encouraging students to reflect and provide input into their own learning strategies and flexibility to approaches to address individual learning needs. 

Class sizes ensure that students have one on one access to trainers on a regular basis.  Classes include an appropriate balance between trainer presentations/ demonstrations and learning activities. 

Delivery methods include creating simulated workplace environments at appropriate stages throughout the course. This is achieved by employing equipment, tools, technology, workplace conditions, legislation, quality standards, and approaches to work that match those currently employed in the industry.  

Students understanding of the workplace and its requirements will be developed throughout the course.  Knowledge of how workplaces operate and how staff complete job roles are developed first through trainers drawing on their own or others’ experience and using learning materials e.g. textbooks, handouts, or videos. 

Theory activities are then implemented to practice applying knowledge gained to situations relevant to performing job tasks. Contexts relate to those that are subsequently used in the simulations. Trainers also use role-play to create simulated environments.  Trainers brief students on the simulated contexts and set the scene prior to implementing role play. 

The environment is created to suit the specific unit requirements and the trainer reinforces understanding through relating to their own experience and drawing upon students’ experience.  Depending on the unit content and context the classroom environment is adapted to recreate the simulated work environment. 

The simulated environments develop the knowledge and theoretical understanding required to undertake appropriate workplace activities and prepare for and practice dealing with situations that arise in the workplace.

Appropriate simulated contexts and activities are incorporated into delivery and prepare students for assessment. These align to the contexts and activities indicated in the units of competency.  The simulated assessment contexts and activities also align to the requirements of each unit of competency. 

Simulated workplace environments: 

  • Reflect real life work tasks.
  • Are required to be performed within industry standard timeframes as specified by assessors in relation to each task. 
  • Are assessed using assessment criteria that relate to the quality of work expected by the industry. 
  • Are performed to industry safety requirements as relevant. 
  • Utilise authentic workplace documentation.
  • Require students to work with others as part of a team.
  • Require students to plan and prioritise competing work tasks. 
  • Involve the use of standard, workplace equipment such as computers and software.
  • Ensure that students are required to consider workplace constraints such as time and budgets

Supervised Study Sessions (4 hours per week) – Optional

In addition to weekly scheduled classes, a 4-hour supervised study session is also provided to students each week. These supervised sessions are designed for trainers to provide support.  Trainers also help students strengthen the required skills for projects, presentations or assessments. Trainers also help students develop their study skills. 

Independent study and assessment outside of class time (4 hours per week)

During independent study students will read the learning material to develop knowledge and understanding.  The learning material includes a mixture of theoretical information and tasks.  Learning material includes sufficient information for the students to learn the topic, undertake practice activities, and complete tasks.  

Homework activities will be provided to students.  Trainers will provide instructions as to the sections of the learning material that must be reviewed and the activities to be completed each week. 

Two hours per week will be spent on homework activities. 

Trainers review/ assess students completed homework activities on a weekly basis at the start of the next scheduled class. By reviewing written homework, verbal responses to questions, and participation in learning activities trainers ascertain whether students have a) completed the allocated tasks and b) understand/ learned the intended knowledge and or skills. 

Two hours will be spent by students each week preparing for in-class assessments and undertaking assessments to be completed in their own time e.g. projects and writing reports. 

Independent study activities are planned by trainers as they progress through each unit. Trainers structure classes depending on the topic and individual learning needs of each student cohort. Study activities for one group may have more of an emphasis on developing knowledge for one unit and on developing foundation skills for another. The individual needs of the cohort are considered, and activities planned accordingly. 

Students with English language learning issues may be allocated more group work to develop knowledge and soft skills at the same time as their English language ability. The English-speaking abilities of students from some countries are often stronger than their English writing ability i.e. Indian students. This may be the opposite for Chinese students who sometimes struggle more with speaking in English. 

The issues arising from the education system students have been exposed to in some countries also influences the learning activities to develop knowledge and skills. Some countries have more of an emphasis on theoretical knowledge and subsequently students struggle when it comes to developing skills to apply knowledge in given contexts. Again, the learning activities chosen will reflect these individual learning needs. 

Students will be expected to undertake activities to develop their English language ability every week. Given that effective business/ management practice is heavily dependent on effective communication skills we recognise this as an important area of communication knowledge/ skills development. English is the main recognised international business language. 

Students are strongly encouraged to speak English only in the classroom and throughout the rest of the day whilst they are at school. Speaking English in non-classroom environment is encouraged to allow them to put into practice what they learn in class. Whether it be during break-time, lunchtime, college excursion, a college activity or in their own time, trainers will routinely encourage students to speak English at every opportunity.

It should be noted that the above indication of time spent on unsupervised study and assessment activities each week are approximations and may vary at different points of the course.  The amount of time Individual students may spend on activities may vary based on their learning needs and individual contexts.

The delivery methodologies/ strategies described above are adjusted to cater for the learner needs of each cohort and the stage of the course. 

Trainers will also contact students on a regular basis to provide support and assistance outside of scheduled face to face classes. During the contact your trainer will provide support and encouragement and discuss:

  • relevant course content and concepts
  • learning opportunities 
  • feedback on submissions
  • opportunities for formative assessment 
  • any issues the Student is experiencing
  • assessment requirements
  • Student progress 
  • course delivery schedule

Students could be provided with opportunities to undertake formative assessment during delivery. Trainers provide feedback to students on areas for improvement to facilitate the development of appropriate knowledge and skills and prepare them for summative assessment.  

The trainer may provide additional learning support where gaps are identified in the participant’s underpinning knowledge.  Training staff will make a reasonable adjustments to adjust delivery methodologies and materials to cater for individual learning needs.

The effectiveness of training and assessment strategies and practices (including independent study) and delivery methodologies are also reviewed/ assessed. Feedback from students is collected on an ongoing basis. Student’s ability to successfully complete learning activities and achieve satisfactory course progress by performing satisfactorily in summative assessment tasks is also used to assess effectiveness.  Formal course assessment takes place each year when each course is reviewed.  Refer to the Validation section of the training and assessment strategy for each course for further details on quality review activities.

 

Not Applicable

Some units are assessed stand-alone and some are clustered for assessment.  Refer to the course delivery schedule for details on clusters. 

Students commence undertaking summative assessment tasks once the relevant teaching/ learning has been completed and they have been provided opportunities for formative assessment. All summative assessment activities will be conducted by Ashton College assessors.  

Students undertake assessment at Ashton College’s main campus, at Ashton College’s Training kitchen, their work placement organisation, and in their own time. 

    1. Ashton College head campus: 213 Nicholson Street, Footscray Melbourne Victoria 3011 
    2. Ashton College Training Kitchen: Ashton Hotel School, Shop 16-18, Metro West Plaza, Footscray Victoria 3011.
    3. Students work placement organisation.

Students are timetabled to attend the campus and training kitchen on separate days.  Trainers advise students about the delivery schedule.  

Each unit of competency assessment includes assessment methods in accordance with unit of competency guidelines, principles of assessment and rules of evidence.  Students undertake assessments to demonstrate competence against the assessment criteria in each unit.  Students attempt each assessment in turn until competency is demonstrated against all unit requirements.

Students will be informed of assessment processes and methodologies pre-enrolment and at orientation.  Assessors will provide copies of the assessment tasks in accordance with the assessment schedule and discuss the assessment requirements with each student prior to them attempting each task.  

To be assessed as satisfactory for each assessment activity, student responses must be at least reasonably correct answers. Students must demonstrate satisfactory performance in each assessment task to be deemed competent in the unit.

Students will be provided with opportunities for re-assessment if they fail to demonstrate competency during assessment tasks.  In certain cases, students may be advised to re-enrol in further training before re-attempting assessments.

Assessment submissions are marked S – Satisfactory or NS – Not Satisfactory and verbal and/or written feedback provided.  Unit results are recorded as C – Competent and NYC – Not Yet Competent. 

Students will be permitted 2 attempts to demonstrate competency in each assessment.  If they are still unable to demonstrate satisfactory competence at this point, they must re-enrol in the unit and undertake the training again.

Assessments employ a variety of theoretical and practical tasks to assess student’s knowledge and skills in relation to the unit context.  The context of the simulated workplace environment may be incorporated into assessment tools (where appropriate) and students complete tasks to workplace standards. 

Students attempt each assessment in turn until all the assessments contained in the course are complete.  On successful completion of all assessments, the student will be awarded the course qualification.

The assessment process is implemented in accordance with Ashton College’s Assessment, Access and Equity, Academic Misconduct and Complaints and Appeals policies and procedures.

Upon successful completion of 33 units of competency, students will be issued a SIT60316 Advanced Diploma of Hospitality Management qualification and a record of results that indicates the units are successfully completed. Students who successfully complete some but not all of the units of competency in the course, they will be issued a Statement of Attainment detailing the units they have successfully completed.

Advanced diploma of hospitality management course